Wallaby and Wallaroo Care https://wallabywallaroo.com Wallaby and Wallaroo Care Wed, 04 Dec 2019 07:30:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wallabywallaroo.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/cropped-Front-Cover-Hi-Res-32x32.jpg Wallaby and Wallaroo Care https://wallabywallaroo.com 32 32 First 3 Things You Need to Know About Getting a Wallaby as Pet https://wallabywallaroo.com/first-3-things-need-know-getting-wallaby-pet/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=first-3-things-need-know-getting-wallaby-pet Mon, 29 Aug 2016 14:31:45 +0000 http://wallabywallaroo.com/?p=117 As with most pets, owning a wallaby comes with a lot of responsibilities. And along with these responsibilities is to learn more about the animal, their characteristics, diet, and breeding behaviors. One of the very first decisions you will make when adopting a joey is whether to adopt a boy or a girl, or both, […]

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First 3 Things You Need to Know About Getting a Wallaby as Pet was first posted on August 29, 2016 at 2:31 pm.
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As with most pets, owning a wallaby comes with a lot of responsibilities. And along with these responsibilities is to learn more about the animal, their characteristics, diet, and breeding behaviors. One of the very first decisions you will make when adopting a joey is whether to adopt a boy or a girl, or both, should you want to breed them later. And with this, you need to understand their sexual maturity.

Choose Your Wallaby

Female Bennett’s wallaby or more popularly known as red-necked wallaby, reach sexual maturity at around 1 year old. They reach their full size at about 3 years old. Male Bennett’s wallabies on the other hand, reach their sexual maturity at about 2 years old. Thus, if you’re thinking of raising both, you should know your female will be ready to breed long before the male can perform.

A fully grown female red-necked wallaby can reach around two and a half feet high and weigh up to 30 to 40 lbs. Neutered male Bennett’s on the other hand, is about the same size, but a little heavier. In some cases, male Bennett’s wallabies can reach up to 60 lbs.

Wallabies, like their kangaroo cousins, jump high, though not as high as their bigger relatives. Bennett’s wallabies can actually jump over a 4-foot fence, but most of the time, they can’t jump over 6-foot fences. They can stay healthy for about 12 to 18 years. Gray is the common color for wallabies, though there are white or albino types, which are actually a little larger than the regular ones. Of course, because they’re rare, albino wallabies are pricier.

If You Don’t Want To Breed

If you don’t actually wish to breed your wallabies, then you can decide for whatever gender of wallaby you want. Most experts often recommend getting one or two male joeys and have them neutered. Though many consider the females are tamer, sweeter and easier to handle, there is actually very little difference between the two gender types, aside from their size. Upbringing and unique individual personality still play the bigger role on the animal’s temperament. Generally, wallabies are tamed and socialized animals. The most important thing is that you have a good outdoor space for these animals.

Know About the USDA Guidelines

In the US, should you wish to breed and sell these exotic animals, you will be required by the USDA to complete licensing certification and follow the guidelines set by the government for the living conditions and housing of the wallabies. USDA will also put you on unannounced visits to make sure you’re actually following their guidelines. The guidelines may not be difficult, but they can be time-consuming and includes some expenses. Basic requirements include accurate record keeping, heating requirements, feeding and housing and at least 6 feet perimeter fencing, aside from an enclosure of at least 3 feet away from the public. Also included is a safety system should the wallaby escaped its enclosure.

Also, the USDA Licensed Facilities will require you to keep record of yearly vet inspections of your facility, including availability and access to the facility, medications, and USDA inspection records. In other words, owning wallabies as pets in the US may require a lot of work.

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First 3 Things You Need to Know About Getting a Wallaby as Pet was first posted on August 29, 2016 at 2:31 pm.
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5 Little Known Facts About Wallabies https://wallabywallaroo.com/5-little-known-facts-wallabies/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-little-known-facts-wallabies Mon, 22 Aug 2016 12:24:13 +0000 http://wallabywallaroo.com/?p=114 Wallabies are far from being mysterious animals, which may lead people to believe they know everything about these cute animals, after all, they look and kind of act like kangaroos. However, like kangaroos, there are many different species of wallabies, and though they may have similar characteristics, each has their own unique identity that makes […]

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Wallabies are far from being mysterious animals, which may lead people to believe they know everything about these cute animals, after all, they look and kind of act like kangaroos. However, like kangaroos, there are many different species of wallabies, and though they may have similar characteristics, each has their own unique identity that makes them special. Here are five facts not many people know about wallabies.

They Are Furless and Pink at Birth

Like kangaroos and many marsupials, newborn wallabies (also called joey), are furless, pink and blind. They’re about the same size of jellybeans, quite tiny, and look helpless. After a month or so of gestation, they reach the pouch of their mother. They’re attached to their mother through a teat, and suckle it for the next 6 or 7 months.

The joey will stay attached to its mother’s pouch until they are able to develop and become independent. They may spend some time outside their pouch, but quickly jump back in the second they sense danger. It will take about 9 months for a joey to become fully independent.

They Can Swim

Like kangaroos, wallabies are actually good swimmers. They use their hind legs to kick through the water independently, and swim using ‘dog’ paddle motion. This is quite interesting, as they often can’t use their legs on land, independently. They swim mostly at dusk, especially the Swamp Wallaby.

Nurturing Mother Wallabies Can Make 2 Types of Milk

This is another amazing fact about wallabies –wallabies (the female of course) have a remarkable ability to make two different types of milk simultaneously – they produce a type of milk suitable for developing joey on one nipple, and another type of milk for larger joey on the other nipple. Each type of milk has its own different lipid composition, protein and carbs. Milk for bigger joey is higher in fat content, which is essential for its more active lifestyle.

This is because it is common for female wallabies to take care of three young joeys simultaneously; with one as an inseminated egg in its uterus, the other being suckled on its pouch, and a third one which is more active, and has already left the pouch, but climbs back to suckle from time to time.

They Communicate by Thumping

Wallabies prefer to use olfactory and visual signals for communications, though they can also use auditory and even tactile methods. When sensing danger, they froze up and make thumping noises with their foot to warn the other of the potential threat. They can also make hissing and snorting sound.

Birds, Other Predatory Animals and Even Humans Hunt Them Down

Because they’re relatively small, wallabies are automatic preys when it comes to mapping up the food chain in the wild. Dingoes, Tasmanian devils, European foxes, eagles (i.e. wedge-tailed), snakes, and cats, and dogs hunt them as preys. Humans, often consider them as pests in their farm, to protect forests, or through road kills, especially when their population is in boom. As a matter of fact, like kangaroos, wallabies account as one of the highest number of wildlife killed on the roads of Australia.

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Facts About WallabieFacts About Wallabies and Kangaroos, and Their Threats for Survivals and Kangaroos, and Their Threats for Survival https://wallabywallaroo.com/facts-wallabiefacts-wallabies-kangaroos-threats-survivals-kangaroos-threats-survival/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=facts-wallabiefacts-wallabies-kangaroos-threats-survivals-kangaroos-threats-survival Mon, 15 Aug 2016 09:22:38 +0000 http://wallabywallaroo.com/?p=111 Both kangaroos and wallabies are marsupials, meaning they carry their young in their pouch. Both also belong to a minor number of animals referred as macropods – or plant eating marsupials. The word ‘macropod’ actually means ‘big foot’, hence, the larger and more powerful hind legs, and larger feet, as well as long and muscular […]

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Both kangaroos and wallabies are marsupials, meaning they carry their young in their pouch. Both also belong to a minor number of animals referred as macropods – or plant eating marsupials. The word ‘macropod’ actually means ‘big foot’, hence, the larger and more powerful hind legs, and larger feet, as well as long and muscular tails for balance. Both animals are also only naturally found in Australia and Papua New Guinea. They’re more active at dusk, night, and dawn. And unlike other marsupials like koalas and wombats, kangaroos and wallabies have forward-opening pouches.

Where They Live

Both animals live about everywhere in Australia, but each of their specie has their preferred environment suited for their characteristics.

Red kangaroos for example, prefer the open and flat plains. Grey kangaroos may overlap them in their environment, but they prefer living in the forests or anywhere with denser vegetation. Tree kangaroos (two of its species live in Australia) are usually found in the mountain rainforests of north Queensland.

Wallaroos on the other hand, have quite a widespread range in the inland; however; they are more commonly found in the stony grounds or rocky outcrops.

Rock wallabies love to stay in cliffs, piles of boulders and rocky hills. Smaller wallaby species on the other hand, live in various habitats, from deserts, forests to woodlands.

Their Diet

As said earlier, both are plant-eating animals or better known as herbivores.  Most of their diet consist grass, leaves, ferns, herbs, fruits and even flowering plants. Kangaroos can eat insects, and like cows.

As with many marsupials, if not all, both kangaroos and wallabies regurgitate their food; and re-chew it later before it’s totally digested, very similar to cows.

How Long Do Wallabies and Kangaroos Live?

Wallabies tend to be much more short-lived than their bigger relatives. They can live up between 11 to 15 years in the wild, and slightly shorter in captivity, which is around 10 to 14 years. Kangaroos on the other hand, have an average lifespan of 20 to 25 years in the wild, and 15-20 years in captivity. In some cases, they can survive up to 30 years.

Threats for Survival

Both animals roam around Australia and are practically unchallenged by any predators; although carnivorous marsupials as well as Tasmanian tigers have always been threats to their survival. As with any other species, the peopling of Australia, particularly the arrival of Indigenous people around 40,000 to 60,000 years ago had a significant impact on both animals’ numbers in the wild; as they were continuously hunted, while their habitat have been frequently burned down for farming, cattle raising and human occupation. The arrival of dingo, or the Australian wild dog in around 3,500 years ago, has become their number one predator.

Also, the arrival of European settlers in Australia had the most significant effect on the native animals in the country, particularly the kangaroos. Kangaroos compete with European livestock for pasture, and Europeans introduced various predators such as foxes and even domesticated animals such as dogs and cats, have pushed them towards the inlands.

Some species of both wallabies and kangaroos have gone extinct; while others have become endangered, while many are considered vulnerable, meaning their specie is facing a high risk for extinction in the wild.

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Different Types of Wallabies, How they behave and Communicate in the Wild https://wallabywallaroo.com/different-types-wallabies-behave-communicate-wild/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=different-types-wallabies-behave-communicate-wild Mon, 08 Aug 2016 12:18:50 +0000 http://wallabywallaroo.com/?p=98 Kangaroos and wallabies share many different characteristics. For one, they’re both marsupials, meaning they are pouched animals – females of both species keep their young inside their pouch until they’re large and strong enough to survive on their own. And as with many marsupials, they’re both herbivores (plant-eating animals). Differentiating Wallabies from Kangaroos However, kangaroos […]

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Kangaroos and wallabies share many different characteristics. For one, they’re both marsupials, meaning they are pouched animals – females of both species keep their young inside their pouch until they’re large and strong enough to survive on their own. And as with many marsupials, they’re both herbivores (plant-eating animals).

Differentiating Wallabies from Kangaroos

However, kangaroos and wallabies are very distinct from each other. The former is significantly bigger, as a matter of fact; the largest male red kangaroo can grow up to 6 feet tall with 3.5 of tail and weigh more than 200 lbs. Also, though both have powerful hind legs for leaping, kangaroo’s hind legs are significantly more powerful, as they’re known to jump as high as 6 feet and as far as 30 feet. Hence, the nickname “living pogo sticks.”

Wallabies on the other hand, are like the shorter and stockier cousin of kangaroos. The term “wallaby” is referred to any kangaroo with back food less than 10 inches long.

Different Types of Wallabies, their Habitat and How They Co-Exist with Others

There are about 30 different species of wallabies. Similar to the possums, wallabies don’t have a distinct biological group, which means they fall into several broad categories. Typical types like Agile wallaby, Black wallaby and Red-necked wallaby, are more closely related to kangaroos, and they have a lot common of physical characteristics, except of course for the size.

The smallest of them of them is the tammar wallaby and Parma wallaby, with the former commonly found in southwestern Australia and its adjacent islands, and the latter in New South Wales. Both species have heads and bodies around 20 inches long, with their tails a little longer. Tammar wallabies are distinct for their ability to drink salt water.

Rock wallabies on the other hand, are more like goats in terms of behavior. They also have soft fur that usually blends nicely in the rocky and dry surroundings of their habitat. They’re pretty agile, hopping across rocks.

Generally, they prefer to live in the forest, rather than semi-arid planes. Kangaroos prefer to dwell on the latter, as it’s suitable for their leaner, larger and more flat-footed feet.

The Whiptail wallaby is by far, the most sociable marsupial. They live in groups of 50 individuals, and many mobs can live in the same territory, making an even bigger population of whiptail wallabies.

How Wallabies Communicate

Wallabies don’t make a lot of noise. But they usually communicate through grunting or making a hissing sound. Zoologists believe though wallabies use auditory and tactile methods to communicate, they actually prefer to communicate through visual and olfactory signals. However, when they sense danger, they adopt a frozen posture and make foot thumps (which sounds like a drum) of one or two beats, and sometimes accompanied with hissing or snorting sounds, to warn the mob of the potential threat. And like kangaroos, they use their hind legs to deliver powerful kicks to their predators.

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Development and Life Cycle of Wallabies https://wallabywallaroo.com/development-life-cycle-wallabies/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=development-life-cycle-wallabies Mon, 01 Aug 2016 09:18:42 +0000 http://wallabywallaroo.com/?p=97 As a marsupial or pouched animal, wallaby belongs to the family of the kangaroos. There are actually about 30 different wallaby species called macropod belonging to the scientific family of Macropodidae. The word ‘macropodidae actually means ‘big feet’, because like kangaroos, wallabies have big back legs and that helps them hop, and shorter front legs […]

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As a marsupial or pouched animal, wallaby belongs to the family of the kangaroos. There are actually about 30 different wallaby species called macropod belonging to the scientific family of Macropodidae. The word ‘macropodidae actually means ‘big feet’, because like kangaroos, wallabies have big back legs and that helps them hop, and shorter front legs that work like arms and hands. Like kangaroos, wallabies are widely distributed throughout Australia, New Zealand and their neighboring islands. However, wallabies are significantly smaller than kangaroos. A small number of wallabies can also be found in the UK, as more than 100 wallabies living in the Isle of Man due to zoo escapes.

Wallaby species vary in size; from small to medium. The largest specie can go up to 6 feet (1.8 meters) in height (from head to tail) and weigh around 2 to 24 kilograms (4 to 53 lbs.).

Like kangaroos, wallabies use their powerful hind legs to hopping around at high speed or jump for a few feet. They use their tails for balance and support when sitting. They can also use their back legs to deliver powerful kicks when fighting.

Their Habitat

Unlike kangaroos that lives and dwells in open arid planes, wallabies actually prefer wooded or rugged areas. This means you can usually find them in remote areas. This is because wide open spaces are better for the flat feet of kangaroos. Smaller wallabies can even be seen living in the forests.

There are a lot of different species of wallabies, grouped roughly by their habitat, such as brush wallabies, shrub wallabies and rock wallabies. Hare wallabies got their name for hare-like behavior and size.

Their Diet

As with most marsupials, wallabies are herbivores, which means they feed mainly on grasses and various plants. Their flat teeth and elongated face makes conducive for them to chew different types of vegetation. Some other species, such as the Tammar wallaby, actually prefer areas without any supply of fresh water, and they survive by relying on plant juices. What is more amazing is that, they can even drink salty water.

Life Cycle

Depending on their species, most wallabies are ready to breed when they reach 14 to 19 months old. The female wallaby will give birth to an underdeveloped embryonic young; the newborn joey (wallaby young) will be still blind, have no hair, and as tiny as a bean. When born, it crawls to its mother’s pouch and attach its mouth to one of the teats, which will then swell inside the young wallaby to ensure it will not be detached or dislodged when it’s mom move and hop around.

They leave their mother’s pouch to learn how to hop, but they quickly jump back in as soon as they sense danger. The joey will be ready to leave its mom’s pouch permanently by 8 to 9 months. However, young wallaby will likely stay with its mom for around 24 months.

In the wild, they can live for about 7 to 10 years, and a little longer in captivity, which is about 12 to 15 years.

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Differentiating Kangaroos and Wallabies https://wallabywallaroo.com/differentiating-kangaroos-wallabies/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=differentiating-kangaroos-wallabies Mon, 25 Jul 2016 18:18:39 +0000 http://wallabywallaroo.com/?p=96 Kangaroos and wallabies are both marsupials, belonging to the same family called Macropodidae, under the genus Macropus. Both animals overlap in their native territories, but their most distinguishable difference is their size. Wallabies are distinctively smaller, with more varied color patterns. Kangaroos on the other hand, live longer, but they take longer time to grow […]

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Kangaroos and wallabies are both marsupials, belonging to the same family called Macropodidae, under the genus Macropus. Both animals overlap in their native territories, but their most distinguishable difference is their size. Wallabies are distinctively smaller, with more varied color patterns. Kangaroos on the other hand, live longer, but they take longer time to grow and are more independent than their relatives.

Comparing and Differentiating Kangaroos and Wallabies

Size Difference

Kangaroos and wallabies are very different from each other. Kangaroos are larger marsupials. Red kangaroos for example are the largest; males can go as tall as 6 feet (2 meters) and weigh up to 200 lbs. (90 kilos). Grey kangaroos are just slightly smaller (lighter and shorter), but still significantly bigger than wallabies.

Male wallabies on the other hand, weigh on an average of 40 lbs. (20 kilograms), while the females can only weigh around 25 lbs. (11 kg.)

Lifespan

Kangaroos live longer than wallabies. They can go up to 20 to 25 years in the wild, and 16 to 20 years in captivity. In some cases, they can reach up to 30 years.

Wallabies on the other hand, tend to live shorter, as they only have an average lifespan of 11 to 15 years, or 10 to 14 years in captivity.

Lifecycle

Both of their young are called joey, and both animals will give birth to one joey at a time. Females carry their young in their pouch until they’re independent. Wallabies stay in their mother’s pouch longer, and wean when they reach 7 to 8 months. They mate between 12 to 14 months.

Kangaroos nurse until they’re 9 months old, and stay in their mother’s pouch up to 11 months. By the time they reach 20 months, they are ready to breed.

Both species live in mobs (small family groups), which is led by a dominant male, and a bunch of females, their offspring, and submissive males. When baby a kangaroo has been weaned, but still not independent to leave their mother’s pouch, the mother leaves the mob until the baby kangaroo is gone.

Physical Characteristics

Kangaroos usually have evenly distributed color patterns throughout their body. Grey kangaroos for example, have different shades of dark and light grey, pretty similar to red kangaroos, but the latter has patches of white on their face, ears, and legs.

Wallabies on the other hand, are monochromatic. Agile wallabies usually have stripes on their hips and cheeks. Red-necked wallabies on the other hand, have thick furs with different colors, such as red, fawn, dark brown, black, grey and white.

Wallaby ears tend to be larger (proportionally speaking) than in kangaroos. Other than that, both animals are very similar in other physical features, such as power in their distinctive hind legs and tail, which forms like a tripod when at rest.

Kangaroos can be aggressive, which is why we usually find them boxing other kangaroos.

Both animals have conflicted with humans in their native environment. And because they’re herbivores, they compete with other domesticated animals for food, such as cattle.

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Differentiating Kangaroos and Wallabies was first posted on July 25, 2016 at 6:18 pm.
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